ADMISSIONS BLOG

Admissions Blog

Research in the Duke-NUS MD Programme:

I am Xue Ling, a born-and-bred Singaporean who did my undergraduate studies in Molecular Cell Biology and Economics at UC Berkeley. My four years in Berkeley were a huge eye-opener; it first exposed me to world-class research and passionate scientists and professors who were both knowledgeable in their fields, and dedicated to teaching. Fast forward to today, I am now a final year Duke-NUS student who just completed my research project on ultrasonography of the trigger finger.

As part of the Duke-NUS curriculum, our third year of medical school comprises 9 months of research that concludes with a thesis submission. These 9 months enable us to delve further into a scientific field we are interested in, and equip us with valuable skills for future research undertakings as doctors.

Choosing a research topic:

Most of my classmates and I chose research areas that were related to a specialty we were interested in. We also asked our seniors for advice on mentors and research topics, which ranged from mouse model work on signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer, to a comparison of imaging modalities on renal perfusion.

More about my research:

I’m currently finishing my Masters of Science in Global Health at Duke University, in what is an extended third year of research during my Duke-NUS MD. Right now in preparation to transition back to Duke-NUS Medical School, I have a renewed sense of self and goals. With that spirit I will join Team Healthy Kids to run the upcoming New York City Marathon this November. Your encouragement and support - whether financial, vocal, social media, or even a commitment to run – will go a long way towards this mission that is very near and dear to me. Please take a minute to visit the following link below:

https://www.crowdrise.com/ActionforHealthyKidsnyc2016/fundraiser/kuoben

Growing up in a family of physicians in Taiwan and the United States, medicine as a career choice ironically wasn’t always my first nor my second choice. But after a long journey of different experiences, the calling and desire to become a doctor became clear. Anticipating the long road ahead, I knew if I wanted to see this through, I had to enjoy the journey. How do I now synthesise my experiences, background, and my passion to chart a path that I am truly excited about? This reflection letter came about and gave me the clarity and the peace of mind that I needed.

ben kuo

Year Two

After a year of TeamLEAD sessions in the classroom, the second year Dukies will be released into the real world. It might seem exciting to some and scary to others, but it is definitely an experience that is unique to the life of a medical student. One way to think about this experience might be to compare it with the concept in the olden days of an apprentice, where the young disciple learns first-hand from his master how things are done, and at times even tries his hand at some tasks.

Modern day learning is more structured. The ward learning experience is broadly divided into six specialties, each lasting four to eight weeks, called clerkships. The schedule differs slightly across different clerkships but generally speaking, the student attends and even participates in morning rounds, specialist clinics, and specialized procedures, if any. This is supplemented with specialised teaching sessions in the wards, like bedside tutorials. Through these, the student should be able to pick up skills in examining and communicating with a patient, to read signs and obtain necessary information to make diagnoses and plans for the patient.

Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships

Introducing…

Qasim Hussaini (Year 2 MD student)

qasim

On a medical missions trip to Vietnam

Tell us about your path to Duke-NUS.

Prior to coming to Duke-NUS, I was in the US for 8 years. I completed my BSc. in Biochemistry and Genetics at beautiful Washington State University on the west coast. Following graduation I packed bags and headed east to Baltimore. At the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, I worked full-time as a research technologist. My work centered on adult neurogenesis and its implications in neurological disorders. While working at Hopkins, I also obtained a MSc. in Biotechnology with an emphasis on regulatory affairs. Following my time there, I completed a one-year research fellowship with a more translational focus at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota before I joined Duke-NUS.

What are some of your interests and hobbies?

Running, traveling, writing, reading, movies and watching random cat videos on YouTube. Contrary to popular belief, you can definitely have time to yourself during med school to do things that you love and enjoy.

Hello there. Allow me to introduce myself. My name’s Brian Chan. I’m a Singaporean and physician-in-training with the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore MD programme. My college days were spent roaming around the Faculty of Science at the National University of Singapore, where I chanced upon a BSc (Hons) in Life Sciences.

Having a coffee break with my friends Kian Leong (left) and Mei Xing (right). I'm the one in the middle.