EDUCATION MUSINGS

Author: 
Sandy Cook

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/the-hidden-costs-of-active-learning.aspx?m=1

This recent opinion piece suggest that active learning creates faculty burnout - that it is an overwhelming burden to deliver and review all the material generated from the active learning process?  Is it the way it was carried out - or is there a way to counteract this?  

Author: 
Scott Compton

I was speaking with a research-scientist the other day who teaches in our Brain & Behaviour course.  She was saying that she would like to become even more involved in the medical education program of the school.  I was delighted to hear this!  While brainstorming possibilities, I asked if she was interested in conducting educational research.  She shrugged slightly, looked away, and with her voice trailing off said, "I don't know... I've heard that the quality of educational research is... kind of... low".  I immediately had visions of my amygdala glowing blindingly-white as my "fight" instinct had me lacing up my academic boxing gloves.  Fortunately, some form of evolutionary reaction intervened on behalf of my professionalism, and I muttered something like, "Well, we won't do that kind of research".  It was as convincing of a response that I could muster at the moment.

Author: 
Scott Compton

“The most important thing I learned is that soldiers watch what their leaders do. You can give them classes and lecture them forever, but it is your personal example they will follow.”
– General Colin Powell

Author: 
Scott Compton
Keep Calm and Hack

Duke-NUS is in the process of making a significant change to the student requirements.  In short, the 9-month research period that has been the hallmark of our curriculum may now be expanded to represent a “scholarly development” experience, aligned with the revised mission statement of the school. 

Duke-NUS Mission Statement (revised, 2017):

Author: 
Scott Compton

One of the things that has shaped my approach toward managing people the most was told to me by Clayton Christensen (Harvard Business Professor): "People usually think that in order to help people you should become a doctor or a nurse or a teacher. But, if you really want a career that will impact people's lives the most, become a Manager. As a Manager, you directly impact the quality of people's lives more than anyone, except perhaps their spouse." I agree completely. It's an awesome responsibility.

http://chronicle.com/article/The-Top-5-Faculty-Morale/236231/